The Benchmade Proper Pocketknife: The Full Nick Shabazz Review

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The%20ONLY%20Honest%20Make%20Money%20Offer%20You'll%20Find

Today, we’re going to take a look at a Properly interesting knife, the very first Slipjoint knife from Benchmade, the Benchmade Proper.

46 thoughts on “The Benchmade Proper Pocketknife: The Full Nick Shabazz Review

  1. David S says:

    Too pricey for what it is, and anything less than perfect fit/finish in even a moderately pricey knife is unacceptable. In a 'modern' slip joint (easier to manufacture to a high standard than a traditional), it's a disgrace.

  2. M M says:

    It’s a slip joint why would u put your finger out on the blade ? Funny your love affair with spyderco,I have both and overall spyderco dose not come close overall in quality and Benchmade is American made ……………….!!!!!!!!!!!!

  3. Sebastian m says:

    S30v steel: $50
    Scales: $20
    Benchmade name: $50

    Saying you own a Benchmade Knife: Priceless

    Why buy a knife with better fit and finish when you can buy a Benchmade?

  4. YoungBeezy says:

    im not a slipjoint kinda guy but this is a cool knife. i got one and i always carry it loose in my pocket along with my bigger edc. Definitely one of my favorite knives at the moment.

  5. Slick Slicers says:

    A nice wee knife. I have 2, the sheepy in green micarta and the DLC/blue G10 ltd edition version. I’m in UK , so all my edc knives are sub 3” slippies, but this is firmly in the rotation of 7 or 8 everyday knives. Honestly, I think the closing on your finger thing is just paranoia. I’ve been using slip-joints for well over 45 years, and I’ve never, ever had one close on my fingers. I expect it’s a worry for people who rely on locks, when some of us really never had that luxury. Yes they are expensive. I bought my 2 Enzo PK70s, which are better in every measure than this knife, for less than even my cheaper Proper. Oh, yes and I do have a 940 which I’d love to carry, if only it was legal. Certainly the 940 has better fit & finish than my Propers.

  6. Travis W Rigg says:

    Revisiting this review after getting into slipjoints (DO NOT GET INTO SLIPJOINTS) I find myself asking "Why does this knife actually exist?" Back when I first heard about this knife I was willing to overlook the backspring not being completely flush and the action being pretty bleh. But now that I have a slipjoint or two (IT'S MORE THAN THAT, DO NOT GET INTO SLIPJOINTS) in my collection, this knife lacks the things that make a slipjoint most compelling. The fit and finish isn't there. The action is bleh. The slicing power is just not very interesting. I think the appeal of a modern slipjoint is in having the best of both worlds. A modern steel. Modern cover materials. Great fit and finish bordering on perfection. Slicing capabilities like no other.

    I'd been thinking about maybe getting one just to see if I would like it but after I handled it in a store it's a hard pass for me.

    Also after getting into slipjoints (DO NOT GET INTO SLIPJOINTS) I've learned why a slipjoint with a decent action is generally not disassemblable. That spring needs to be so strong that at some point the question becomes why bother? Nick touches on it in his review of the J E Made. I think that's why the Lionsteel CK-1 series is pinned underneath the bolted on covers (which… Really?). It's just so hard that lionsteel would rather you not try and then be angry that they made a knife that was so hard to reassemble.

  7. Slick Slicers says:

    I’ve two of these, the green micarta and a blue g10 dlc Ltd edition versions. I love them, though the Ltd one has only ever been out of the box to admire it, the micarta one has been carried a lot and is one of my edc knives. I’m in the U.K. so sub 3” slipjoints are all we’re allowed and I’ve about 30 or so of them. This is, along with my 2 Enzo PK70’s, my Quiet Carry The West and my two Taylor’s Eye Witness Barlows (spectacular looking knives) are my most frequent users day to day. My other favourite, on the homestead, is another Benchmade, the 940!

  8. braeden says:

    I was looking at one of these for carrying in public because it doesn't look scary. I want something that I can pull out without people getting nervous.

  9. Slick Slicers says:

    For me, in the U.K., this is a top choice for EDC. My 940 could get me 4 years in jail (yes, I know, it’s ridiculous!), but this is 100% legal and it’s only real competition is the Enzo PK70 (I’ve two of each).

  10. Slick Slicers says:

    If only it were “a hundred and twenty bucks” here in the U.K.! Here everything is more expensive, but this is around £133 or nearer $180! But it’s close to the price of the Enzo PK70, which it is close to in terms of a modern take on a traditional knife. These two are two of my favourite U.K. EDC knives, the other being a Taylor’s Eye Witness hand made, worked back, rams horn Barlow. Either of the modern pair blow the Barlow out of the water, but the Barlow is so beautiful and so traditional I can overlook all it’s short comings! Incidentally, though these three cost £133 for the Benchmade, £120 for the Barlow and £108 for the Enzo (carbon fibre version, the titanium/G10 is £133, the same as the Proper). Of course, if the law wasn’t so dreadful here, I’d have a 940!

  11. Slick Slicers says:

    Why the obsession with your knives ‘folding on you’? I’m in my 50’s and grew up with slip joints. I never had a lockback till I was in my 20’s and, being in Scotland, we’ve not been allowed them for a while, but I’ve never, ever had any knife locking or slipjoint fold on me. Perhaps there’s a connection with your reliance on locks?

  12. Benji Driscoll says:

    Kudos to Benchmade for making a knife for those who can't legally own something else. Working with limitations of blade sizes and mechanisms, Benchmade have put their foot in the door to countries with strict knife laws. Something I hope all other brands do.

  13. RED S7VN says:

    This knife is designed to be a serious user. It's meant to be dropped in your pocket and dinged up. It doesn't need a pocket slip. You city boys love your accessories. Why add bulk with a pocket slip. Also as a working/user it isn't meant to be silly smooth with "walk & talk" it's a work knife. It's better than a Case and the price is about perfect.

  14. winomaster says:

    If the Proper does not move you, then you are more likely a Spidy sort of fan that don't seem to be sold at all on looks. I bought one of these the other day. I know the function is not where they focused most of their attention. But, much of that is lost on me. I like knives as works of art and only secondarily for their smooth function. But, they don't call this a gentleman folder for no reason. The non-locking design should have clarified that for all. This knife has gone into retirement in my pocket.

  15. Flodo says:

    im going back to the roots from flippers etc to slipjoints…never got the same joy from using a modern knife as from a simple little knife…started with vics of all sorts as a young boy, then my first cheap linerlock with thumb stud, then flippers with all sorts of locks, to some more traditional fixed styles and finally im into the slipjoint game again with the bm 319 micarta and some vic aloxs…and finally im happy:)

  16. Recon Ty says:

    It looks really nice. But why does it costs over $100? I know Benchmade. I've got a Lansky World Legal and it comes with a blade medic for around $20, and it has a half stop. Love that beast!

  17. Toadstkr says:

    I hated mine it lacked so much tension that to me it was dangerous. I don’t buy the excuse that “it’s there first slip joint” are you telling me none of there designers or whatever own or handled a quality traditional?

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