Marine Corps Combat Pistol Training





U.S. Marines stationed at Pu’uloa Rifle Range, Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, participate in a training video designed to showcase the new Combat …

23 thoughts on “Marine Corps Combat Pistol Training

  1. J. Corban Murphy says:

    A failure drill is if your target hasn't stopped after two two the chest, then one to the head. It doesn't mean shoot the target twice, see he/she hasn't stopped, and look for other targets before shooting him/her again.

  2. Tyler Reis says:

    9 second speed reload lmao, and wtf is the shit he does before re holstering? Hermmm, lemme just er checkidy check my mag here to make sure I really did fire two rounds or something i guess and why not hit the slide for shits and grins, but i dont need to press check here that wouldn't make sense and take too long derrrr" smh

  3. Defcon Supply says:

    Not wanting to sound disapproving but these guys need some work. As a pistol instructor I understand the idiom that smooth is fast but I guess where a handgun is not a primary weapon these folks can afford to be a bit slow. Since most military issued handguns are more likely to shoot the operator than the enemy perhaps these drills make sense

  4. Oscar Gonzalez says:

    when people hit black in a fight, they forget the most simple things -even forgetting to breathe… this instills muscle memory of not getting tunnel vision when shit does hit the fan.. combat isnt silhouettes and paper targets.

  5. Roy Rodriguez says:

    way better up date .. seems slow but remember any training one will use all the time allowed  … seems like a good basic start .for a lot of people who carry but are not into combat shooting with a hand gun as the rifle is their main weapon ..if one is thinking of up grading the level that is for outside training .. or fun time on the range ..

  6. Aikibiker1 says:

    I see a lot of excessive waste motion and a very poor draw stroke/presentation from the demonstrator who I assume is part of the instructor cadre. A lot of "fishing" and putting his support hand where it could end up in front of the muzzle. I don't understand why he kept hitting the back of his pistol before holstering. Just look at the damn thing to make sure it is in battery, hitting an M9 on the hammer will not make the slide go all the way forward anyway..

    The course of fire seems a lot better then the Army's 25 meter pistol qualification where you never draw from the holster. I would hope that this will evolve to the Marines doing the course of fire wearing their full gear so they can actually practice with their full setup and see how armor and pouch arrangement will affect them. I saw a lot of guys overseas that could not have drawn their pistol quickly because they had an IFAK or something right over top of it. The same held true for ammo pouches being in strange places.

  7. Clay Shaffer says:

    Glad I never took the pistol course that shit looks stupid. the unnecessary head movements and shit everyone is talking about is just the military over complicating simple shit not just at the range

  8. Chris S says:

    What were people expecting to see? I'm sure these exercises are to familiarize yourself with the weapon and put rounds on target. I'm sure once in combat its a lot of on the job training and much of what is taught here is just the substrate for all further knowledge. Can you get shots on target? Can you clear a jammed weapon? Can you quickly reload? Can you check for additional threats? If yes, you have the basics and are able to use these lessons when in combat.

  9. Chris S says:

    What were people expecting to see? I'm sure these exercises are to familiarize yourself with the weapon and put rounds on target. I'm sure once in combat its a lot of on the job training and much of what is taught here is just the substrate for all further knowledge. Can you get shots on target? Can you clear a jammed weapon? Can you quickly reload? Can you check for additional threats? If yes, you have the basics and are able to use these lessons when in combat.

  10. hound4680 says:

    The Marine Corps has much more training. This is the pistol qualification course. Marksmanship is the key here, you also get a pretty little pistol marksmanship badge with it. There is much more training Marines can do if their job(MOS) requires it. This course is very basic and done annually for e6 and above ranks. I'm pretty sure this course is designed for just getting familiar with the m9, because if you are going to get one issued, you might as well shoot it.

  11. Jeff Stanley says:

    When engaging a real threat in combat, tunnel vision of a kind that cannot be duplicated on the range is common if not universal. What can be ingrained at the range, is the muscle memory of turning to assess other possible threats after dealing with the threat to the front. People who deprecate a drill that has been developed at the expense of an unknown number U.S. combat casualties don't know what the hell they're talking about.

  12. MUDWRENCH says:

    Really? This is the STANDARD of Marine pistol training? The pistol is the single most important piece of gear someone can carry, and yet everyone treats it as useless. Very sad. Also I MUST point out one MAJOR FLAW in this training method. NEVER EVER EVER HAVE YOUR GUN POINTED IN A DIRECTION THAT YOU ARE NOT LOOKING UNLESS YOU ARE POINTING IT AT THE GROUND!!!!! Who Came Up With This NONSENSE???!!! Also this video makes Americans look really slow and clueless with a pistol. Americans perfected the art of being fast and precise with a pistol and you are making our troops train for failure. Our Marines should be trained to be the best and fastest with every weapon.

  13. Soverign Cold-Steel says:

    i almost became a marine..on the fateful day of 16sep03 i ran into the pea soup green dressed recruiter and said "are you a marine recruiter?" 15seconds later i was agreeing to join the army…proud of my nativity in hindsight

  14. Bo Ingham says:

    My biggest critique is the use of excessive movement and the unnecessary steps in that magazine check prior to holstering. Add stress, friction, fog of war, etc and you have a recipe for things to go wrong. Keeping the presentation, shooting, and re-holstering of the pistol simple is the best way to go in my opinion. Let's break it down. "The head check" is quite simply one of the newest trends that looks neat in practice but in actuality takes your attention away from the threat. The magazine round check it not necessary. If you are out of ammo, reload. Assess the threat, draw, fire, holster. Simple. Just because the Marine Corps is utilizing a technique doesn't mean that technique translates to "high speed, low drag".

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