“End Him Rightly” – A bizarre tactic in a Medieval fighting manual (Gladiatoria MS KK5013)




If you want to mess ’em up, unscrew your pommel and throw it! Wait… what?? This is a really strange “technique” shown in manuscript KK5013, which is part of …

35 thoughts on ““End Him Rightly” – A bizarre tactic in a Medieval fighting manual (Gladiatoria MS KK5013)

  1. TheAnonymousMrGrape says:

    Just thought of something.

    Could this potentially be like a Medieval version of a paper town or the like? i.e. A bit of fake information in a document to test whether something similar was actually stolen or not. Maybe this nonsense technique was included so that in the event another identical fencing manual was produced, the author of this book would have a form of proof it was copied.

  2. SETHONAN MOBILE GAMING says:

    Well… What IF their pommels could be unscrewed with just 2 or 3 turns so you would actually be able to use this as a basic tactic?
    I mean their meta game was such that the manual states WHEN, not IF. So this was a tactic used in almost every encounter.
    The gear then would allow you to access a throwable pommel with very little effort, so little that you could actually lose a couple seconds switching weapons around.

  3. Alexander Dashit says:

    Yeah i don't think this was widely used. I mean, "ending him quickly" seems to mean "finish him off" menaing, he's already down. The pommel is just stupid. just sway your sword if you think the almost dead man being able to counter you.

  4. Max Backle says:

    I can bbn only think of 3 reasons why or how this would work in a fight. The combatant could loosen the pommel of the sword prior to starting the fight that way it could be removed much quicker. Second thought is that it may be possible early threaded pummels had a low number of threads and only had to be rotated a couple of times to be removed. Now days we have machines and tools that allow for much finer threading then would be practical for hand crafting. Thirdly, who ever wrote this manuscript was jesting in Hope's to see some fool in combat try thos method and everyone could laugh at them.

  5. Tal Tamir says:

    4:30 "this is just, what are you doing"
    A: He is ending him rightly!
    Joking aside, it would make more sense to just carry a rock or a pocketful of sand with you. But it probably wouldn't be allowed by the judges, although I am baffled at judges allowing pommel throws either… unless the whole thing was as orchestrated as modern "wrestling"

  6. Shane Ellis says:

    Lol I highly doubt the threads in the 15 th century pommel are the same as the 21st century machines sword…. doubt the blacksmith had those tools to machine such a long and fine thread, I'd be willing to bet it was an interlocking pommel then a threaded pommel

  7. Fay King says:

    In honor of this joke my DnD campaigns feature a new item/sword enchant/spell. It allows swords (with appropriate furniture) to have that furniture removed with a DC 12 crafts check and thrown per character stats. Anything hit with the pommel is affected by the "Ended Rightly" spell, which is Empowered Death + Disintegrate + Slay Living as per a 20th level caster.

  8. Wanhus says:

    I'm pretty sure screwed pommel were rare at that time period. And those that did exist had far less ridges in them so unscrewing a pommel would like far less time. It takes quite an engineering skill in those days to make ridges of even similar to modern quality. Checking actual swords of that period also show different types of pommel attachments. I could be wrong I'm no historian but this is just my observation.

  9. Trident Titan says:

    "Thoust shan't survive this duel naïve! Taste the blunt justice of the pummel!" unscrews pummel "Now I shall end it rightly!" Throws pummel, bounces of helmet "Curses, foiled by the pummel!" Dies instantly Other guy. "What the f*** was that?"

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *