An example of a “true” bastard sword / hand-and-a-half sword




The term longsword (or “long sword”) is often incorrectly applied to one-handed arming swords (also called knightly sword or riding sword) in video games and …

44 thoughts on “An example of a “true” bastard sword / hand-and-a-half sword

  1. Patches McAdams says:

    I only learned chinese martial arts and in the systems I trained we used a number of weapons but I only learned Chinese broadsword, double butterfly swords, which are very interesting. Also chinese spear and long pole. I know European sword arts are very effective but I think it would be very interesting for you to learn a chinese system. Their weapons styles are very refined although not as many teachers encourage sparring with weapons as they should but there are a number of awsome teachers who do. Check out the Chinese Butterfly Knives/Swords

  2. Patches McAdams says:

    I only learned chinese martial arts and in the systems I trained we used a number of weapons but I only learned Chinese broadsword, double butterfly swords, which are very interesting. Also chinese spear and long pole. I know European sword arts are very effective but I think it would be very interesting for you to learn a chinese system

  3. scepta101 says:

    Thanks for this video! I am working on a fantasy novel featuring a character who is meant to be a master swordsman, and your videos have helped me immensely in picturing his scenes and giving me an idea of what types of things he would say and do in regards to his craft. Also, he actually uses a bastard sword generally so this video has been particularly helpful in getting things about the character correct.

  4. C.Louis says:

    8:59 and if you are a melee/caster hybrid character you can perform the fightingtechniques of a longsword fencer most of the time and combine that with one- handed use while the other hand casts some fancy magic.

    An of course if you have a spare pommel in the off hand you can still fight with the bastardsword before you end the opponent rightly

  5. SFDPSFDP says:

    Interesting videos, thank you!
    As a side note, some may not agree but it always strikes me when shops attribute a modern nationality to a super classical standard western european sword design like this 'English bastard sword'. England's population was tiny compared to France's until the Renaissance (about 1.5 million in 12th century vs 13+ millions in France, where no one called himself french until much later). Most if not all of their bladed weapons designs came from the continent, due to the ruling families ties, cultural proximity and the need to import iron (mostly from Germany and Spain). For me this type of sword could've been Dutch, French,German,Italian etc.. made as well.

  6. Vladimir Kornev says:

    I guess the name "bastard" stuck to this sword just because in comparison to a "normal" long sword it looks like a bastard child in comparison to a "normal" child of some royal person – shorter and weaker in terms of rights and privileges. Does that makes sense?

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